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HIV and early hospital readmission: evaluation of a tertiary medical facility in Lilongwe, Malawi

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2018
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Title
HIV and early hospital readmission: evaluation of a tertiary medical facility in Lilongwe, Malawi
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3050-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kashmira Satish Chawla, Nora E. Rosenberg, Christopher Stanley, Mitch Matoga, Alice Maluwa, Cecilia Kanyama, Jonathan Ngoma, Mina C. Hosseinipour

Abstract

Delivery of quality healthcare in resource-limited settings is an important, understudied public health priority. Thirty-day (early) hospital readmission is often avoidable and an important indicator of healthcare quality. We investigated the prevalence of all-cause early readmission and its associated factors using age and sex adjusted risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). A retrospective review of the medical ward database at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi was conducted between February and December 2013. There were 3547 patients with an index admission of which 2776 (74.4%) survived and were eligible for readmission. Among these patients: 49.7% were male, mean age was 39.7 years, 36.1% were HIV-positive, 34.6% were HIV-negative, and 29.3% were HIV-unknown. The prevalence of early hospital readmission was 5.5%. Diagnoses associated with 30-day readmission were HIV-positive status (RR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.64-3.53) and malaria (RR = 0.45; 95% CI: 0.22-0.91). Other factors associated with readmission were multiple diagnoses (excluding HIV) (RR = 1.52; 95% CI: 1.11-2.06), and prolonged length of stay (≥ 16 days) at the index hospitalization (RR = 3.63; 95% CI: 1.72-7.67). Targeting HIV-infected inpatients with multiple diagnoses and longer index hospitalizations may prevent early readmission and improve quality of care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 23%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,421,810
of 12,846,518 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,938
of 4,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#236,505
of 270,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,846,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,246 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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