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Determinants of family planning use among married women in bale eco-region, Southeast Ethiopia: a community based study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, March 2018
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Title
Determinants of family planning use among married women in bale eco-region, Southeast Ethiopia: a community based study
Published in
BMC Women's Health, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12905-018-0539-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alemayehu Gonie, Alemayehu Wudneh, Dejene Nigatu, Zelalem Dendir

Abstract

Family planning is the ability of individuals and couples to anticipate and attain their desired number of children and the spacing and timing of their births. Providing family planning could prevent maternal deaths by allowing women to delay motherhood, space births, avoid unintended pregnancies and abortions, and stop childbearing when they reach their desired family size. Despite the fact that family planning is advantageous for maternal and newborn health and the services and commodities are free of charge, the reason of not using modern family planning methods is unclear in Bale Eco-Region. Therefore, this study assessed the contraceptive prevalence rate and its determinants among women in Bale Eco-Region, Ethiopia. A community-based cross-sectional study design (both quantitative and qualitative methods) was conducted from December 2016 to February 2017. Five hundred sixty-seven women were successfully interviewed using structured and pre-tested questionnaire. A multistage sampling technique was employed. Data were entered into Epi-data version 3.1 and exported to SPSS version 21. Logistic regression analyses were done and a significant association was declared at p-value less than 0.05. All focus group discussions and key informant interviews were recorded and analyzed thematically. The overall contraceptive prevalence rate was 41.5%. Injectable (48.1%), implants (22.6%) and pills (20.0%) were the most contraceptive methods utilized by study participants. Spousal (husband's) opposition (38.8%), religious beliefs (17.7%), concern and fear of side effects (14.8%), and distance of family planning service (5.9%) were the reasons for not using contraceptive methods. Having more than seven deliveries (AOR = 2.98, CI = 1.91-6.10, P = 0.000) and having birth interval less than 24 months between the last two children (AOR = 3.8, CI = 13.41-21.61, P = 0.003) were significantly associated with utilization of contraceptive methods. Low contraceptive prevalence rate might be attributed by husband opposition, religious beliefs, concern and fear of side effects. Having more than seven deliveries and birth interval less than 24 months between the last two children were determinants of contraceptive use. Family planning consultation opportunities should be created to make male's involved and to increase their responsibility for family planning use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 186 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 186 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 38 20%
Student > Bachelor 25 13%
Researcher 16 9%
Student > Postgraduate 15 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 6%
Other 28 15%
Unknown 52 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 51 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 15%
Social Sciences 15 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 3%
Psychology 5 3%
Other 21 11%
Unknown 60 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2018.
All research outputs
#9,860,044
of 12,875,491 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#574
of 736 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,141
of 270,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#1
of 1 outputs
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