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Non-typeable Haemophilus Influenzae detection in the lower airways of patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Overview of attention for article published in Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine, April 2018
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Title
Non-typeable Haemophilus Influenzae detection in the lower airways of patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Published in
Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40248-018-0123-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Krishna B. Sriram, Amanda J. Cox, Pathmanathan Sivakumaran, Maninder Singh, Annabelle M. Watts, Nicholas P. West, Allan W. Cripps

Abstract

Chronic airway inflammation and hypersensitivity to bacterial infection may contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis. Previous studies have demonstrated that nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is the most common colonizing bacteria in the lower airways of patients with COPD. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of NTHi and immunoglobulin concentrations in patients with lung cancer, COPD and controls. Serum and bronchial wash samples were collected from patients undergoing diagnostic bronchoscopy. Total IgE, IgG and specific NTHi IgG were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Bronchial wash samples were examined for the presence of NTHi via PCR. Out of the 60 patients: 20 had confirmed Lung Cancer, 27 had COPD only and 13 were used as Controls. NTHi was detected in the lower airways of all three groups (Lung Cancer 20%; COPD 22% and Controls 15%). Total IgE was highest in Lung Cancer subjects followed by COPD and control subjects (mean ± SD: 870 ± 944, 381 ± 442, 159 ± 115). Likewise total IgG was higher in Lung cancer (Mean ± SD: 6.99 ± 1.8) patients compared to COPD (Mean ± SD: 5.43 ± 2). The lack of difference in NTHi and specific antibodies between the three groups makes it less likely that NTHi has an important pathogenetic role in subjects with Lung Cancer. However the detection of higher IgE antibody in Lung Cancer subjects identifies a possible mechanism for carcinogenesis in these subjects and warrants further study.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 7 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 38%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Computer Science 1 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 7 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2018.
All research outputs
#9,815,214
of 12,813,846 outputs
Outputs from Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine
#149
of 222 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,717
of 270,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,813,846 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 222 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them