↓ Skip to main content

Prevalence of supplement use in recreationally active Kazakhstan university students

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Prevalence of supplement use in recreationally active Kazakhstan university students
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
DOI 10.1186/s12970-018-0220-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Denis Vinnikov, Zhanna Romanova, Anar Dushpanova, Karashash Absatarova, Zhazira Utepbergenova

Abstract

Little is known about the supplements use and recreational sport practices in Kazakhstan university students. Therefore, the aim of this study was to ascertain supplements use prevalence and their predictors in this population. Cross-sectional survey of both undergraduate and graduate level students was completed in 2017 et al.-Farabi Kazakh National University, the largest higher institution in the country, from almost all Schools. A 45-item questionnaire was used to record physical activity, supplements use, lifestyle attributes (smoking, alcohol, sleep, etc.) and eating habits, and adjusted regression models were used to verify predictors of supplements use. Of the entire sample of 889 students (70% females), 526 (59%) were practicing recreational physical activity (RPA), and walking, jogging and track and field was the most popular activity type (38%). N = 151 (29%) students reported the use of any supplement (31% in men and 27% in women), whereas the most popular supplement type were vitamins. Supplement use was most prevalent in swimmers (55%). Age (odds ratio (OR) 1.19 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.37), use of fitness tracker (OR 6.26 (95% CI 3.90-10.03)) and low-fat diet (OR 1.95 (95% CI 1.23-3.10)), but not income predicted supplements use in adjusted models. With more than half of students exercising regularly, only less than one-third use supplements with a very strong association with fitness tracker use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 18 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Sports and Recreations 7 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 11%
Psychology 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 19 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,374,332
of 12,788,180 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#629
of 652 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#239,109
of 274,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,788,180 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 652 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 46.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,090 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them