↓ Skip to main content

Gene structure, transcripts and calciotropic effects of the PTH family of peptides in Xenopus and chicken

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2010
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Gene structure, transcripts and calciotropic effects of the PTH family of peptides in Xenopus and chicken
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2010
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-10-373
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pedro LC Pinheiro, João CR Cardoso, Ana S Gomes, Juan Fuentes, Deborah M Power, Adelino VM Canário

Abstract

Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) belong to a family of endocrine factors that share a highly conserved N-terminal region (amino acids 1-34) and play key roles in calcium homeostasis, bone formation and skeletal development. Recently, PTH-like peptide (PTH-L) was identified in teleost fish raising questions about the evolution of these proteins. Although PTH and PTHrP have been intensively studied in mammals their function in other vertebrates is poorly documented. Amphibians and birds occupy unique phylogenetic positions, the former at the transition of aquatic to terrestrial life and the latter at the transition to homeothermy. Moreover, both organisms have characteristics indicative of a complex system in calcium regulation. This study investigated PTH family evolution in vertebrates with special emphasis on Xenopus and chicken.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 5%
Portugal 2 5%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Sweden 1 3%
Unknown 33 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 23%
Student > Master 5 13%
Professor 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Other 11 28%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 56%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 May 2013.
All research outputs
#815,893
of 3,632,901 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#470
of 1,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,677
of 98,378 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#25
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,632,901 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,196 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 98,378 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.