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The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and other risk factors among Mongolian dyspeptic patients who have a high incidence and mortality rate of gastric cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Gut Pathogens, April 2018
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1 tweeter

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Title
The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and other risk factors among Mongolian dyspeptic patients who have a high incidence and mortality rate of gastric cancer
Published in
Gut Pathogens, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13099-018-0240-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oyuntsetseg Khasag, Gantuya Boldbaatar, Tserentogtoh Tegshee, Davaadorj Duger, Azzaya Dashdorj, Tomohisa Uchida, Takeshi Matsuhisa, Yoshio Yamaoka

Abstract

Mongolia has not only the second highest incidence rate but also the highest mortality rate for gastric cancer globally. In addition to gastric cancer, ulcerative disease complications are also life threatening; thus, investigating Helicobacter pylori infection and other risk factors is essential. H.pylori infection was high in tested dyspeptic patients from all parts of Mongolia, with an overall infection rate of 80.0%. Logistic regression analysis showed that H. pylori infection was associated with gastritis (odds ratio; 9.0 ([95% confidence interval 5.0-16.2]); p < 0.0001). H. pylori infection (3.3 [2.0-5.4]; p < 0.0001) and > 40 years old (1.5 [1.0-2.0]; p < 0.02) were both associated with atrophy. However, > 40 years old (3.8 [2.4-6.0]; p < 0.0001) and high salt intakes (1.6 [1.0-2.3]; p < 0.02), but not H. pylori infection, were associated with intestinal metaplasia. Excessive amount of salt usage was dramatically higher in northern and western parts of Mongolia, where precancerous diseases, such as erosive esophagitis (for cardia cancer), severe atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia (for non-cardia cancer), were highly prevalent. H. pylori infection was the major gastric health problem among the Mongolian population. In addition, environmental factors such as high salt intake worsened the clinical outcome. Therefore, a nationwide screening and eradication of H. pylori infection as well as salt-reducing measures should be implemented.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 17%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Postgraduate 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2018.
All research outputs
#10,223,858
of 12,799,521 outputs
Outputs from Gut Pathogens
#207
of 285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#207,287
of 274,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gut Pathogens
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,799,521 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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