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Sulforaphane attenuates pulmonary fibrosis by inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 416)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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46 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Sulforaphane attenuates pulmonary fibrosis by inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition
Published in
BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40360-018-0204-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sun Young Kyung, Dae Young Kim, Jin Young Yoon, Eun Suk Son, Yu Jin Kim, Jeong Woong Park, Sung Hwan Jeong

Abstract

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and fatal disease with no effective treatment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical stage during the development of fibrosis. To assess the effect of sulforaphane (SFN) on the EMT and fibrosis using an in vitro transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced model and an in vivo bleomycin (BLM)-induced model. In vitro studies, cell viability, and cytotoxicity were measured using a Cell Counting Kit-8. The functional TGF-β1-induced EMT and fibrosis were assessed using western blotting and a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The lungs were analyzed histopathologically in vivo using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. The BLM-induced fibrosis was characterized by western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses for fibronectin, TGF-β1, E-cadherin (E-cad), and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) in lung tissues. SFN reversed mesenchymal-like changes induced by TGF-β1 and restored cells to their epithelial-like morphology. The results confirmed that the expression of the epithelial marker, E-cadherin, increased after SFN treatment, while expression of the mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin, vimentin, and α-SMA decreased in A549 cells after SFN treatment. In addition, SFN inhibited TGF-β1-induced mRNA expression of the EMT-related transcription factors, Slug, Snail, and Twist. The SFN treatment attenuated TGF-β1-induced expression of fibrosis-related proteins, such as fibronection, collagen I, collagen IV, and α-SMA in MRC-5 cells. Furthermore, SFN reduced the TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of SMAD2/3 protein in A549 cells and MRC-5 cells. BLM induced fibrosis in mouse lungs that was also attenuated by SFN treatment, and SFN treatment decreased BLM-induced fibronectin expression, TGF-β1 expression, and the levels of collagen I in the lungs of mice. SFN showed a significant anti-fibrotic effect in TGF-β-treated cell lines and BLM-induced fibrosis in mice. These findings showed that SFN has anti-fibrotic activity that may be considered in the treatment of IPF.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 17%
Student > Master 6 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Chemistry 2 6%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 8 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2021.
All research outputs
#670,855
of 22,002,998 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#5
of 416 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,585
of 300,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,002,998 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 416 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,322 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them