↓ Skip to main content

The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2009
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
patent
2 patents
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
358 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
579 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2009
DOI 10.1186/gb-2009-10-12-249
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pavel Křeček, Petr Skůpa, Jiří Libus, Satoshi Naramoto, Ricardo Tejos, Jiří Friml, Eva Zažímalová

Abstract

The PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are secondary transporters acting in the efflux of the plant signal molecule auxin from cells. They are asymmetrically localized within cells and their polarity determines the directionality of intercellular auxin flow. PIN genes are found exclusively in the genomes of multicellular plants and play an important role in regulating asymmetric auxin distribution in multiple developmental processes, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tissue differentiation and tropic responses. All PIN proteins have a similar structure with amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains separated by a central hydrophilic domain. The structure of the hydrophobic domains is well conserved. The hydrophilic domain is more divergent and it determines eight groups within the protein family. The activity of PIN proteins is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, protein stability, subcellular localization and transport activity. Different endogenous and environmental signals can modulate PIN activity and thus modulate auxin-distribution-dependent development. A large group of PIN proteins, including the most ancient members known from mosses, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and they regulate the subcellular compartmentalization of auxin and thus auxin metabolism. Further work is needed to establish the physiological importance of this unexpected mode of auxin homeostasis regulation. Furthermore, the evolution of PIN-based transport, PIN protein structure and more detailed biochemical characterization of the transport function are important topics for further studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 579 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 4 <1%
United States 3 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Czechia 2 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Other 6 1%
Unknown 556 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 143 25%
Researcher 92 16%
Student > Master 91 16%
Student > Bachelor 87 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 32 6%
Other 74 13%
Unknown 60 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 342 59%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 133 23%
Chemistry 7 1%
Physics and Astronomy 4 <1%
Environmental Science 4 <1%
Other 19 3%
Unknown 70 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2020.
All research outputs
#2,255,682
of 17,355,315 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#1,842
of 3,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,085
of 340,717 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,355,315 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,593 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.6. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,717 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.