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An EST screen from the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii reveals patterns of gene loss and gain in animals

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
An EST screen from the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii reveals patterns of gene loss and gain in animals
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-9-240
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tokiharu Takahashi, Carmel McDougall, Jolyon Troscianko, Wei-Chung Chen, Ahamarshan Jayaraman-Nagarajan, Sebastian M Shimeld, David EK Ferrier

Abstract

Since the drastic reorganisation of the phylogeny of the animal kingdom into three major clades of bilaterians; Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa and Deuterostomia, it became glaringly obvious that the selection of model systems with extensive molecular resources was heavily biased towards only two of these three clades, namely the Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia. Increasing efforts have been put towards redressing this imbalance in recent years, and one of the principal phyla in the vanguard of this endeavour is the Annelida.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 6%
Germany 3 5%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Israel 1 2%
Uruguay 1 2%
Russia 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 52 80%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 23%
Researcher 11 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 11%
Student > Master 7 11%
Professor 6 9%
Other 18 28%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 66%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 17%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 2 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2012.
All research outputs
#1,130,517
of 4,681,163 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#627
of 1,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,722
of 172,621 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#30
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,681,163 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 172,621 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.