↓ Skip to main content

Prognostic value of liver stiffness in HIV/HCV-Coinfected patients with decompensated cirrhosis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Prognostic value of liver stiffness in HIV/HCV-Coinfected patients with decompensated cirrhosis
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3067-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leire Pérez-Latorre, Matilde Sánchez-Conde, Pilar Miralles, Juan Carlos López, Francisco Parras, Francisco Tejerina, Teresa Aldámiz-Echevarría, Ana Carrero, Cristina Díez, Margarita Ramírez, Isabel Gutiérrez, José María Bellón, Rafael Bañares, Juan Berenguer

Abstract

Little is known about the utility of transient elastography (TE) for assessing the prognosis of patients with decompensated cirrhosis (DC). We analyzed HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with DC who underwent TE as part of their routine follow-up between 2006 and 2015. We also calculated the liver stiffness spleen diameter-to-platelet score (LSPS), FIB-4 index, albumin, MELD score, and Child-Pugh score. The primary outcome was death. The study population comprised 65 patients. After a median follow-up of 32 months after the first TE, 17 patients had received anti-HCV therapy and 31 patients had died. The highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) value for prediction of death was observed with albumin (0.695), followed by Child-Pugh score (0.648), both with P values < .05. Lower AUROC values were observed with MELD score (0.633), TE (0.618), LSPS score (0.595), and FIB-4 (0.569), all with P values > .05. In the univariate Cox regression analysis, albumin, FIB-4, Child-Pugh score, and MELD score, but not TE, were associated with death. In the multivariate analysis, albumin and Child-Pugh score were the only baseline variables associated with death. Our results suggest that TE is not useful for assessing the prognosis of HIV-infected patients with decompensated HCV-related cirrhosis. Albumin concentration and Child-Pugh scores were the most consistent predictors of death in this population group.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 17%
Other 1 8%
Lecturer 1 8%
Professor 1 8%
Other 3 25%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 58%
Unknown 5 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2018.
All research outputs
#12,516,170
of 14,158,567 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4,479
of 5,289 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#240,574
of 277,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,158,567 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,289 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,106 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them