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Harnessing Qatar Biobank to understand type 2 diabetes and obesity in adult Qataris from the First Qatar Biobank Project

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, April 2018
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Harnessing Qatar Biobank to understand type 2 diabetes and obesity in adult Qataris from the First Qatar Biobank Project
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12967-018-1472-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ehsan Ullah, Raghvendra Mall, Reda Rawi, Naima Moustaid-Moussa, Adeel A. Butt, Halima Bensmail

Abstract

Human tissues are invaluable resources for researchers worldwide. Biobanks are repositories of such human tissues and can have a strategic importance for genetic research, clinical care, and future discoveries and treatments. One of the aims of Qatar Biobank is to improve the understanding and treatment of common diseases afflicting Qatari population such as obesity and diabetes. In this study we apply a panorama of state-of-the-art statistical methods and machine learning algorithms to investigate associations and risk factors for diabetes and obesity on a sample of 1000 Qatari population. Regarding diabetes, we identified pronounced associations and risk factors in Qatari population including magnesium, chloride, c-peptide of insulin, insulin, and uric acid. Similarly, for obesity, significant associations and risk factors include insulin, c-peptide of insulin, albumin, and uric acid. Moreover, our study has revealed interactions of hypomagnesemia with HDL-C, triglycerides, and free thyroxine. Our study strongly confirms known associations and risk factors associated with diabetes and obesity in Qatari population as previously found in other population studies in different parts of the world. Moreover, interactions of hypomagnesemia with other associations and risk factors merit further investigations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Master 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 18 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 19%
Computer Science 7 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Mathematics 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 21 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2018.
All research outputs
#9,510,052
of 16,476,438 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1,275
of 3,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,816
of 284,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,476,438 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,091 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,042 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them