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Cardiovascular risk factors among women with self-reported infertility

Overview of attention for article published in Fertility Research and Practice, April 2017
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Title
Cardiovascular risk factors among women with self-reported infertility
Published in
Fertility Research and Practice, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40738-017-0034-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shruthi Mahalingaiah, Fangui Sun, J. Jojo Cheng, Erika T. Chow, Kathryn L. Lunetta, Joanne M. Murabito

Abstract

Amongst women with certain types of ovulatory disorder infertility, the studies are conflicting whether there is an increased risk of long-term cardiovascular disease risk. This paper evaluates the associations of several CVD risk factors among Framingham women with self-reported infertility. Women who completed the Framingham Heart Study Third Generation and Omni Cohort 2 Exam 2 (2008-2011), and reported on past history of infertility and current cardiovascular disease status were included in this cross-sectional study. Directly measured CVD risk factors were: resting blood pressure, fasting lipid levels, fasting blood glucose, waist circumference, and body mass index (BMI). Multivariable models adjusted for age, smoking, physical activity, and cohort. Generalized estimating equations adjusted for family correlations. We performed sensitivity analyses to determine whether the association between infertility and CVD risk factors is modified by menopausal status and menstrual cycle length. Comparing women who self-reported infertility to those who did not, there was an average increase in BMI (β = 1.03 kg/m(2), 95% CI: 0.18, 1.89), waist circumference (β = 3.08 in., 95% CI: 1.06, 5.09), triglycerides (β = 4.47 mg/dl, 95% CI:-1.54, 10.49), and a decrease in HDL cholesterol (β = -1.60 mg/dl, 95% CI: -3.76, 0.56). We estimated that infertile premenopausal women have an increased odds of obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.11, 4.49) and diabetes (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 0.86, 4.49). BMI and waist circumference were the most strongly correlated CVD risk factors amongst women reporting a history of infertility.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Student > Postgraduate 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 13 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 27%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Psychology 2 5%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 11 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2022.
All research outputs
#14,661,890
of 21,814,108 outputs
Outputs from Fertility Research and Practice
#23
of 47 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,728
of 300,160 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Fertility Research and Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,814,108 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 47 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.2. This one scored the same or higher as 24 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,160 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them