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Placebo-controlled trials in pediatrics and the child’s best interest

Overview of attention for article published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Placebo-controlled trials in pediatrics and the child’s best interest
Published in
Italian Journal of Pediatrics, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13052-015-0118-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Luisa Di Pietro, Renato Cutrera, Adele Anna Teleman, Maria Luisa Barbaccia

Abstract

For too long children have received medicines not sufficiently studied for their needs and, in fact, being considered as small replicas of adults, it was deemed sufficient to adjust the dosage of a drug approved for adults. Together with the limited availability of appropriate drug formulations, especially for neonates and toddlers, this approach has caused increased iatrogenic risk and/or suboptimal adherence to treatment. With the aim of encouraging the development of more efficacious and safer medicines for children, the Regulatory Agencies in Europe and U.S.A. commendably issued directives to promote adequate and well controlled pediatric clinical trials. In compliance with the agenda of the Pediatric Regulation, in the past decade the number of pediatric patients enrolled in double-blind randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is markedly increased. In order to establish the efficacy of new medicines, RCTs frequently include a placebo-control group that carries the burden of additional, and to some extent underestimated, ethical concerns with respect to trials in adults. Six years into the Pediatric Regulation implementation, off-patent drugs, most of which at present are extensively used off-label, are underrepresented in ongoing/proposed pediatric RCTs. We debate this status quo to assess what might be the child's best interest. In fact, we argue that well-designed studies, in which efficacy and safety of new drugs are compared to off-patent drugs that are currently prescribed off-label, would achieve the aim of the Pediatric Regulation better and more ethically than placebo controlled RCTs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 37%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Philosophy 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2015.
All research outputs
#8,124,438
of 15,045,928 outputs
Outputs from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#166
of 560 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,016
of 217,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,045,928 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 560 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,426 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them