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Hemorrhagic stroke after Epley maneuver: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 423)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Hemorrhagic stroke after Epley maneuver: a case report
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40463-018-0268-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paige Moore, Trung Le, Brian Blakley, Jason Beiko, Eric Meen

Abstract

This is the first case to our knowledge of a serious adverse event following the Epley maneuver, which is the treatment of choice for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common vestibular disorder in adults. A 77 year old female presented for outpatient evaluation of vertigo at a tertiary otolaryngology clinic. She was found to have BPPV clinically, and elected to have a particle repositioning maneuver (Epley maneuver) performed in clinic. Immediately following Epley maneuver, she had severe nausea and vomiting, with evolving visual changes. A CT angiogram of the brain was performed urgently through the emergency department and demonstrated an acute intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the occipital lobe. After medical stabilization and rehabilitation, the patient continues to have a permanent visual field deficit. The Epley maneuver is safe and effective, and there are no prior reports of serious adverse events associated with its use. This case, in which a patient experienced a hemorrhagic stroke after undergoing the Epley maneuver, is the first and sole case in the medical literature of an Epley-associated serious adverse event. The indirect causation and extreme rarity of this event do not warrant any change to patterns of practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 24%
Other 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 7 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 22%
Neuroscience 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2020.
All research outputs
#2,795,711
of 21,343,339 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#28
of 423 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,945
of 298,863 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,343,339 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 423 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,863 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them