↓ Skip to main content

Simulations of pattern dynamics for reaction-diffusion systems via SIMULINK

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Systems Biology, April 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Simulations of pattern dynamics for reaction-diffusion systems via SIMULINK
Published in
BMC Systems Biology, April 2014
DOI 10.1186/1752-0509-8-45
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wang K, Steyn-Ross ML, Steyn-Ross DA, Wilson MT, Sleigh JW, Shiraishi Y, Kaier Wang, Moira L Steyn-Ross, D Steyn-Ross, Marcus T Wilson, Jamie W Sleigh, Yoichi Shiraishi, D Alistair Steyn-Ross

Abstract

Investigation of the nonlinear pattern dynamics of a reaction-diffusion system almost always requires numerical solution of the system's set of defining differential equations. Traditionally, this would be done by selecting an appropriate differential equation solver from a library of such solvers, then writing computer codes (in a programming language such as C or Matlab) to access the selected solver and display the integrated results as a function of space and time. This "code-based" approach is flexible and powerful, but requires a certain level of programming sophistication. A modern alternative is to use a graphical programming interface such as Simulink to construct a data-flow diagram by assembling and linking appropriate code blocks drawn from a library. The result is a visual representation of the inter-relationships between the state variables whose output can be made completely equivalent to the code-based solution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 68 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 29%
Student > Master 12 17%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Professor 6 8%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 14 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 14%
Computer Science 5 7%
Chemical Engineering 5 7%
Physics and Astronomy 5 7%
Other 24 33%
Unknown 9 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2015.
All research outputs
#6,362,547
of 11,197,915 outputs
Outputs from BMC Systems Biology
#435
of 966 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,822
of 213,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Systems Biology
#8
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,197,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 966 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,598 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.