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Common risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases among older adults in China, Ghana, Mexico, India, Russia and South Africa: the study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) wave 1

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2015
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421 Mendeley
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Title
Common risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases among older adults in China, Ghana, Mexico, India, Russia and South Africa: the study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) wave 1
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1407-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fan Wu, Yanfei Guo, Somnath Chatterji, Yang Zheng, Nirmala Naidoo, Yong Jiang, Richard Biritwum, Alfred Yawson, Nadia Minicuci, Aaron Salinas-Rodriguez, Betty Manrique-Espinoza, Tamara Maximova, Karl Peltzer, Nancy Phaswanamafuya, James J Snodgrass, Elizabeth Thiele, Nawi Ng, Paul Kowal

Abstract

Behavioral risk factors such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, insufficient physical activity and the harmful use of alcohol are known and modifiable contributors to a number of NCDs and health mediators. The purpose of this paper is to describe the distribution of main risk factors for NCDs by socioeconomic status (SES) among adults aged 50 years and older within a country and compare these risk factors across six lower- and upper-middle income countries. The study population in this paper draw from SAGE Wave 1 and consisted of adults aged 50-plus from China (N=13,157), Ghana (N=4,305), India (N=6,560), Mexico (N=2,318), the Russian Federation (N=3,938) and South Africa (N=3,836). Seven main common risk factors for NCDs were identified: daily tobacco use, frequent heavy drinking, low level physical activity, insufficient vegetable and fruit intake, high risk waist-hip ratio, obesity and hypertension. Multiple risk factors were also calculated by summing all these risk factors. The prevalence of daily tobacco use ranged from 7.7% (Ghana) to 46.9% (India), frequent heavy drinker was the highest in China (6.3%) and lowest in India (0.2%), and the highest prevalence of low physical activity was in South Africa (59.7%). The highest prevalence of respondents with high waist-to-hip ratio risk was 84.5% in Mexico, and the prevalence of self-reported hypertension ranging from 33% (India) to 78% (South Africa). Obesity was more common in South Africa, the Russia Federation and Mexico (45.2%, 36% and 28.6%, respectively) compared with China, India and Ghana (15.3%, 9.7% and 6.4%, respectively). China, Ghana and India had a higher prevalence of respondents with multiple risk factors than Mexico, the Russia Federation and South Africa. The occurrence of three and four risk factors was more prevalent in Mexico, the Russia Federation and South Africa. There were substantial variations across countries and settings, even between upper-middle income countries and lower-middle income countries. The baseline information on the magnitude of the problem of risk factors provided by this study can help countries and health policymakers to set up interventions addressing the global non-communicable disease epidemic.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 421 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 415 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 89 21%
Student > Postgraduate 48 11%
Student > Bachelor 44 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 10%
Researcher 32 8%
Other 98 23%
Unknown 67 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 120 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 60 14%
Social Sciences 48 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 4%
Psychology 11 3%
Other 74 18%
Unknown 91 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2015.
All research outputs
#2,574,330
of 4,849,854 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,853
of 5,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,381
of 148,616 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#130
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,849,854 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,407 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 148,616 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.