↓ Skip to main content

Impact of the terrestrial-aquatic transition on disparity and rates of evolution in the carnivoran skull

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
101 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Impact of the terrestrial-aquatic transition on disparity and rates of evolution in the carnivoran skull
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0285-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katrina E Jones, Jeroen B Smaers, Anjali Goswami

Abstract

BackgroundWhich factors influence the distribution patterns of morphological diversity among clades? The adaptive radiation model predicts that a clade entering new ecological niche will experience high rates of evolution early in its history, followed by a gradual slowing. Here we measure disparity and rates of evolution in Carnivora, specifically focusing on the terrestrial-aquatic transition in Pinnipedia. We analyze fissiped (mostly terrestrial, arboreal, and semi-arboreal, but also including the semi-aquatic otter) and pinniped (secondarily aquatic) carnivorans as a case study of an extreme ecological transition. We used 3D geometric morphometrics to quantify cranial shape in 151 carnivoran specimens (64 fissiped, 87 pinniped) and five exceptionally-preserved fossil pinnipeds, including the stem-pinniped Enaliarctos emlongi. Range-based and variance-based disparity measures were compared between pinnipeds and fissipeds. To distinguish between evolutionary modes, a Brownian motion model was compared to selective regime shifts associated with the terrestrial-aquatic transition and at the base of Pinnipedia. Further, evolutionary patterns were estimated on individual branches using both Ornstein-Uhlenbeck and Independent Evolution models, to examine the origin of pinniped diversity.ResultsPinnipeds exhibit greater cranial disparity than fissipeds, even though they are less taxonomically diverse and, as a clade nested within fissipeds, phylogenetically younger. Despite this, there is no increase in the rate of morphological evolution at the base of Pinnipedia, as would be predicted by an adaptive radiation model, and a Brownian motion model of evolution is supported. Instead basal pinnipeds populated new areas of morphospace via low to moderate rates of evolution in new directions, followed by later bursts within the crown-group, potentially associated with ecological diversification within the marine realm.ConclusionThe transition to an aquatic habitat in carnivorans resulted in a shift in cranial morphology without an increase in rate in the stem lineage, contra to the adaptive radiation model. Instead these data suggest a release from evolutionary constraint model, followed by aquatic diversifications within crown families.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Chile 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Serbia 1 <1%
Unknown 95 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 22%
Researcher 21 21%
Student > Master 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Other 18 18%
Unknown 9 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 60 59%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 17 17%
Environmental Science 5 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 <1%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 <1%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 11 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,827,016
of 6,417,267 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,166
of 1,688 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,301
of 164,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#37
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,417,267 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,688 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,334 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.