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Addressing social issues in a universal HIV test and treat intervention trial (ANRS 12249 TasP) in South Africa: methods for appraisal

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2015
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Title
Addressing social issues in a universal HIV test and treat intervention trial (ANRS 12249 TasP) in South Africa: methods for appraisal
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1344-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joanna Orne-Gliemann, Joseph Larmarange, Sylvie Boyer, Collins Iwuji, Nuala McGrath, Till Bärnighausen, Thembelile Zuma, Rosemary Dray-Spira, Bruno Spire, Tamsen Rochat, France Lert, John Imrie

Abstract

The Universal HIV Test and Treat (UTT) strategy represents a challenge for science, but is also a challenge for individuals and societies. Are repeated offers of provider-initiated HIV testing and immediate antiretroviral therapy (ART) socially-acceptable and can these become normalized over time? Can UTT be implemented without potentially adding to individual and community stigma, or threatening individual rights? What are the social, cultural and economic implications of UTT for households and communities? And can UTT be implemented within capacity constraints and other threats to the overall provision of HIV services? The answers to these research questions will be critical for routine implementation of UTT strategies. A social science research programme is nested within the ANRS 12249 Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) cluster-randomised trial in rural South Africa. The programme aims to inform understanding of the (i) social, economic and environmental factors affecting uptake of services at each step of the continuum of HIV prevention, treatment and care and (ii) the causal impacts of the TasP intervention package on social and economic factors at the individual, household, community and health system level. We describe a multidisciplinary, multi-level, mixed-method research protocol that includes individual, household, community and clinic surveys, and combines quantitative and qualitative methods. The UTT strategy is changing the overall approach to HIV prevention, treatment and care, and substantial social consequences may be anticipated, such as changes in social representations of HIV transmission, prevention, HIV testing and ART use, as well as changes in individual perceptions and behaviours in terms of uptake and frequency of HIV testing and ART initiation at high CD4. Triangulation of social science studies within the ANRS 12249 TasP trial will provide comprehensive insights into the acceptability and feasibility of the TasP intervention package at individual, community, patient and health system level, to complement the trial's clinical and epidemiological outcomes. It will also increase understanding of the causal impacts of UTT on social and economic outcomes, which will be critical for the long-term sustainability and routine UTT implementation. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01509508 ; South African Trial Register: DOH-27-0512-3974.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 179 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Unknown 176 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 37 21%
Student > Master 30 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 13%
Student > Bachelor 15 8%
Student > Postgraduate 11 6%
Other 33 18%
Unknown 30 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 46 26%
Social Sciences 28 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 12%
Psychology 16 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 3%
Other 25 14%
Unknown 38 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2015.
All research outputs
#3,424,646
of 4,836,654 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,605
of 5,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,606
of 144,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#191
of 221 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,836,654 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,392 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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