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Social influences on seeking help from mental health services, in-person and online, during adolescence and young adulthood

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
110 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
314 Mendeley
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Title
Social influences on seeking help from mental health services, in-person and online, during adolescence and young adulthood
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0429-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Debra J Rickwood, Kelly R Mazzer, Nic R Telford

Abstract

This study provides the first comprehensive empirical evidence of developmental changes in the social influences on seeking mental health care, both in-person and online, during the critical lifestages for mental health of adolescence and young adulthood. Main source of help-seeking influence was determined via self-report for all young people accessing youth-targeted mental health services in Australia for a first episode of care over a 12 month period during 2013. This comprised 30,839 young people who accessed in-person services and 7,155 clients of the online service. Results show a major developmental shift in help-seeking influence across the age range, which varied for males and females, and a striking difference between the online and in-person service modalities. The dominant influence online, regardless of age, was the young person themself. In contrast, for in-person services, the dominant influence during adolescence was family, but this changed markedly in late adolescence to favour self-influence, with a lessor, but still substantial effect of family. The influence of friends was surprisingly low. To support young people with mental health problems to access mental health care, the personal connection of parents and family needs to be engaged to encourage in-person service use through better mental health literacy, particularly for adolescents. In the online environment, ways to ensure that young people themselves are guided to appropriate services are required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 314 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Unknown 310 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 58 18%
Student > Master 53 17%
Student > Bachelor 49 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 31 10%
Researcher 23 7%
Other 45 14%
Unknown 55 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 119 38%
Social Sciences 42 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 27 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 2%
Other 20 6%
Unknown 72 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2022.
All research outputs
#735,775
of 21,686,541 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#178
of 4,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,928
of 231,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,686,541 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,437 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,593 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them