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Does the early social environment prepare individuals for the future? A match-mismatch experiment in female wild cavies

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, April 2018
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3 tweeters

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Does the early social environment prepare individuals for the future? A match-mismatch experiment in female wild cavies
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12983-018-0261-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susanne Sangenstedt, Carsten Szardenings, Norbert Sachser, Sylvia Kaiser

Abstract

The social environment that mothers experience during pregnancy and lactation has a strong effect on the developing offspring. Whether offspring can be adaptively shaped to match an environment that is similar to the maternal one is still a major question in research. Our previous work in wild cavies showed that females whose mothers lived in a stable social environment with few social challenges during pregnancy and lactation (SE-daughters) developed different behavioral phenotypes than females whose mothers lived in an unstable social environment with frequent social challenges during pregnancy and lactation (UE-daughters). In the present study we investigated whether SE-daughters are better adapted to a stable social environment, similar to their maternal one, than are UE-daughters, for which the stable social environment represents a mismatch with their maternal one. For this purpose, we established pairs of one UE- and one SE-daughter and housed them together under stable social conditions for one week. Dominance ranks, behavioral profiles, glucocorticoid levels, cortisol responsiveness and body weight changes were compared between the groups. We hypothesized that SE-daughters fare better in a stable social setting compared to UE-daughters. After one week of cohabitation in the stable social condition, UE-daughters had higher glucocorticoid levels, tended to gain less body weight within the first three days and displayed higher frequencies of energy-demanding behaviors such as rearing and digging than SE-daughters. However, there was no difference in cortisol responsiveness as well as in dominance ranks between UE- and SE-daughters. Higher glucocorticoid levels and less body weight gain imply that UE-daughters had higher energy demands than SE-daughters. This high energy demand of UE-daughters is further indicated by the increased display of rearing and digging behavior. Rearing implies increased vigilance, which is far too energy demanding in a stable social condition but may confer an advantage in an unstable social environment. Hence, SE-daughters seem to better match a stable social environment, similar to their maternal one, than do UE-daughters, who encountered a mismatch to their maternal environment. This data supports the environmental matching hypothesis, stating that individuals manage the best in environments that correspond to their maternal ones.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 8 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 37%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 11 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2018.
All research outputs
#8,036,443
of 12,813,846 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#362
of 470 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,660
of 224,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#7
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,813,846 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 470 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.6. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,306 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.