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Overview of attention for article published in Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, January 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 678)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
77 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
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Title
Published in
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, January 2005
DOI 10.1186/1751-0147-46-121
Pubmed ID
Authors

A Egenvall, BN Bonnett, Å Hedhammar, P Olson

Abstract

This study continues analysis from a companion paper on over 350,000 insured Swedish dogs up to 10 years of age contributing to more than one million dog-years at risk during 1995-2000. The age patterns for total and diagnostic mortality and for general causes of death (trauma, tumour, locomotor, heart and neurological) are presented for numerous breeds. Survival estimates at five, eight and 10 years of age are calculated. Survival to 10 years of age was 75% or more in Labrador and golden retrievers, miniature and toy poodles and miniature dachshunds and lowest in Irish wolfhounds (91% dead by 10 years). Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the relative risk for general and more specific causes of death between breeds accounting for gender and age effects, including two-way interactions. Older females had tumour as a designated cause of death more often than males in most breeds, but not in the Bernese mountain dog. Information presented in this and the companion paper inform our understanding of the population level burden of disease, and support decision-making at the population and individual level about health promotion efforts and treatment and prognosis of disease events.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 76 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 23%
Student > Bachelor 12 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 14%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Other 17 22%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 25%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 18 23%
Engineering 2 3%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 8 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2021.
All research outputs
#1,327,327
of 18,663,462 outputs
Outputs from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#14
of 678 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,033
of 225,992 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,663,462 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 678 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,992 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them