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A quantitative non-invasive assessment of femoroacetabular impingement with CT-based dynamic simulation - cadaveric validation study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, March 2015
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Title
A quantitative non-invasive assessment of femoroacetabular impingement with CT-based dynamic simulation - cadaveric validation study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12891-015-0504-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maarten A Röling, Monique I Visser, Edwin HG Oei, Peter Pilot, Gert-Jan Kleinrensink, Rolf M Bloem

Abstract

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is caused by an anatomic deviation of the acetabular rim or proximal femur, which causes chronic groin pain. Radiological identification of FAI can be challenging. Advances in imaging techniques with the use of computed tomography (CT) scan enable 3D simulation of FAI. We made an experimental cadaveric validation study to validate the 3D simulation imaging software. The range of motion (ROM) of five cadaveric hips was measured using an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS). Specific marked spots in the femur and pelvis were created as reproducible EMTS registration points. Reproducible motions were measured. Hips were subsequently imaged using high-resolution CT after introduction of artificial cam deformities. A proprietary software tool was used, Articulis (Clinical Graphics) to simulate the ROM during the presence and absence of the induced cam deformities. According to the EMTS, 13 of the 30 measured ROM end-points were restricted by > 5° due to the induced cam deformities. Using Articulis, with the same 5° threshold, we correctly detected 12 of these 13 end point limitations and detected no false positives. The median error of the measured limitations was 1.9° (interquartile range 1.1° - 4.4°). The maximum absolute error was 5.4°. The use of this dynamic simulation software to determine the presence of motion limiting deformities of the femoroacetabular is validated. The simulation software is able to non-invasively detect a reduction in achievable ROM, caused by a cam type deformity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 54 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 18%
Researcher 9 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Other 4 7%
Other 14 25%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 42%
Engineering 9 16%
Mathematics 2 4%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 12 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2015.
All research outputs
#3,338,006
of 5,033,220 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,213
of 1,695 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,626
of 149,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#52
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,033,220 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,695 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.