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Adaptation of Lymnaea fuscus and Radix balthica to Fasciola hepatica through the experimental infection of several successive snail generations

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, July 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Adaptation of Lymnaea fuscus and Radix balthica to Fasciola hepatica through the experimental infection of several successive snail generations
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, July 2014
DOI 10.1186/1756-3305-7-296
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Rondelaud, Amal Titi, Philippe Vignoles, Abdeslam Mekroud, Gilles Dreyfuss

Abstract

High prevalence of Fasciola hepatica infection (>70%) was noted during several outbreaks before the 2000s in several French farms where Galba truncatula is lacking. Other lymnaeids such as Lymnaea fuscus, L. glabra and/or Radix balthica are living in meadows around these farms but only juvenile snails can sustain complete larval development of F. hepatica while older snails were resistant. The low prevalence of infection (<20%) and limited cercarial production (<50 cercariae per infected snail) noted with these juveniles could not explain the high values noted in these cattle herds. As paramphistomosis due to Calicophoron daubneyi was not still noted in these farms, the existence of another mode of infection was hypothesized. Experimental infection of several successive generations of L. glabra, originating from eggs laid by their parents already infected with this parasite resulted in a progressive increase in prevalence of snail infection and the number of shed cercariae. The aim of this paper was to determine if this mode of snail infection was specific to L. glabra, or it might occur in other lymnaeid species such as L. fuscus and R. balthica.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 23%
Professor 5 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 35%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 9 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,140,971
of 5,181,137 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#518
of 1,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,180
of 152,599 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#39
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,181,137 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,592 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 152,599 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.