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Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 promotes the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into keratinocyte-like cells in xeno-free conditioned medium

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, March 2015
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Title
Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 promotes the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into keratinocyte-like cells in xeno-free conditioned medium
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13287-015-0008-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhenzhen Li, Shichao Han, Xingqin Wang, Fu Han, Xiongxiang Zhu, Zhao Zheng, Hongtao Wang, Qin Zhou, Yunchuan Wang, Linlin Su, Jihong Shi, Chaowu Tang, Dahai Hu

Abstract

Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple cell types, have recently become a novel strategy for cell-based therapies. The differentiation of BMSCs into keratinocytes may be beneficial for patients with burns, disease, or trauma. However, the currently available cells are exposed to animal materials during their cultivation and induction. These xeno-contaminations severely limit their clinical outcomes. Previous studies have shown that the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 can promote induction efficiency and regulate the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In the present study, we attempted to establish a xeno-free system for the differentiation of BMSCs into keratinocytes and to investigate whether Y-27632 can facilitate this differentiation. BMSCs isolated from patients were cultured by using a xeno-free system and characterised by using flow cytometric analysis and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assays. Human primary keratinocytes were also isolated from patients. Then, the morphology, population doubling time, and β-galactosidase staining level of these cells were evaluated in the presence or absence of Y-27632 to determine the effects of Y-27632 on the state of the keratinocytes. Keratinocyte-like cells (KLCs) were detected at different time points by immunocytofluorescence analysis. Moreover, the efficiency of BMSC differentiation under different conditions was measured by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analyses. The ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 promoted the proliferation and lifespan of human primary keratinocytes. In addition, we showed that keratinocyte-specific markers could be detected in BMSCs cultured in a xeno-free system using keratinocyte-conditioned medium (KCM) independent of the presence of Y-27632. However, the efficiency of the differentiation of BMSCs into KLCs was significantly higher in the presence of Y-27632 using immunofluorescence, quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blot analyses. This study demonstrated that Y-27632 could promote the proliferation and survival of human primary keratinocytes in a xeno-free culture system. In addition, we found that BMSCs have the ability to differentiate into KLCs in KCM and that Y-27632 can facilitate this differentiation. Our results suggest that BMSCs are capable of differentiating into KLCs in vitro and that the ROCK pathway may play a critical role in this process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 31%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Student > Master 4 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 15%
Psychology 2 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2015.
All research outputs
#11,591,017
of 14,629,909 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#982
of 1,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,173
of 215,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#8
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,629,909 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,354 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 215,935 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.