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Inhibition of SHP2 in basal-like and triple-negative breast cells induces basal-to-luminal transition, hormone dependency, and sensitivity to anti-hormone treatment

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, March 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Inhibition of SHP2 in basal-like and triple-negative breast cells induces basal-to-luminal transition, hormone dependency, and sensitivity to anti-hormone treatment
Published in
BMC Cancer, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1131-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hua Zhao, Yehenew M Agazie

Abstract

The Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2 (SHP2) is a positive effector of cell growth and survival signaling as well transformation induced by multiple tyrosine kinase oncogenes. Since the basal-like and triple-negative breast cancer (BTBC) is characterized by dysregulation of multiple tyrosine kinase oncogenes, we wanted to determine the importance of SHP2 in BTBC cell lines. Short hairpin RNA-based and dominant-negative expression-based SHP2 inhibition techniques were used to interrogate the functional importance of SHP2 in BTBC cell biology. In addition, cell viability and proliferation assays were used to determine hormone dependency for growth and sensitivity to anti-estrogen treatment. We show that inhibition of SHP2 in BTBC cells induces luminal-like epithelial morphology while suppressing the mesenchymal and invasive property. We have termed this process as basal-to-luminal transition (BLT). The occurrence of BLT was confirmed by the loss of the basal marker alpha smooth muscle actin and the acquisition of the luminal marker cytokeratin 18 (CK18) expression. Furthermore, the occurrence of BLT led to estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) expression, hormone dependency, and sensitivity to tamoxifen treatment. Our data show that inhibition of SHP2 induces BLT, ERα expression, dependency on estrogen for growth, and sensitivity to anti-hormone therapy. Therefore, inhibition of SHP2 may provide a therapeutic benefit in basal-like and triple-negative breast cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 6 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 March 2015.
All research outputs
#2,125,860
of 4,932,759 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#759
of 2,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,209
of 147,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#45
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,932,759 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,778 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 147,254 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.