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Age-dependent decrease in glutamine synthetase expression in the hippocampal astroglia of the triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model: mechanism for deficient glutamatergic transmission?

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Neurodegeneration, July 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
patent
1 patent

Citations

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134 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
173 Mendeley
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Title
Age-dependent decrease in glutamine synthetase expression in the hippocampal astroglia of the triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model: mechanism for deficient glutamatergic transmission?
Published in
Molecular Neurodegeneration, July 2011
DOI 10.1186/1750-1326-6-55
Pubmed ID
Authors

Markel Olabarria, Harun N Noristani, Alexei Verkhratsky, José J Rodríguez

Abstract

Astrocytes are fundamental for brain homeostasis and the progression and outcome of many neuropathologies including Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD) generalised hippocampal astroglia atrophy precedes a restricted and specific β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque-related astrogliosis. Astrocytes are critical for CNS glutamatergic transmission being the principal elements of glutamate homeostasis through maintaining its synthesis, uptake and turnover via glutamate-glutamine shuttle. Glutamine synthetase (GS), which is specifically expressed in astrocytes, forms glutamine by an ATP-dependent amination of glutamate. Here, we report changes in GS astrocytic expression in two major cognitive areas of the hippocampus (the dentate gyrus, DG and the CA1) in 3xTg-AD animals aged between 9 and 18 months. We found a significant reduction in Nv (number of cell/mm3) of GS immunoreactive (GS-IR) astrocytes starting from 12 months (28.59%) of age in the DG, and sustained at 18 months (31.65%). CA1 decrease of GS-positive astrocytes Nv (33.26%) occurs at 18 months. This Nv reduction of GS-IR astrocytes is paralleled by a decrease in overall GS expression (determined by its optical density) that becomes significant at 18 months (21.61% and 19.68% in DG and CA1, respectively). GS-IR Nv changes are directly associated with the presence of Aβ deposits showing a decrease of 47.92% as opposed to 23.47% in areas free of Aβ. These changes in GS containing astrocytes and GS-immunoreactivity indicate AD-related impairments of glutamate homeostatic system, at the advanced and late stages of the disease, which may affect the efficacy of glutamatergic transmission in the diseased brain that may contribute to the cognitive deficiency.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 173 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 166 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 23%
Researcher 25 14%
Student > Master 25 14%
Student > Bachelor 23 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 6%
Other 26 15%
Unknown 25 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 54 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 1%
Other 9 5%
Unknown 36 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2019.
All research outputs
#2,401,263
of 17,351,915 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#336
of 684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,496
of 109,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,351,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 684 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 109,180 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.