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Factors associated with treatment-seeking for malaria in urban poor communities in Accra, Ghana

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2018
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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136 Mendeley
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Title
Factors associated with treatment-seeking for malaria in urban poor communities in Accra, Ghana
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2311-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raphael Baffour Awuah, Paapa Yaw Asante, Lionel Sakyi, Adriana A. E. Biney, Mawuli Komla Kushitor, Francis Agyei, Ama de-Graft Aikins

Abstract

In Ghana, about 3.5 million cases of malaria are recorded each year. Urban poor residents particularly have a higher risk of malaria mainly due to poor housing, low socio-economic status and poor sanitation. Alternative treatment for malaria (mainly African traditional/herbal and/or self-medication) is further compounding efforts to control the incidence of malaria in urban poor communities. This study assesses factors associated with seeking alternative treatment as the first response to malaria, relative to orthodox treatment in three urban poor communities in Accra, Ghana. This cross-sectional study was conducted in three urban poor localities in Accra, Ghana among individuals in their reproductive ages (15-59 years for men and 15-49 years for women). The analytic sample for the study was 707. A multinomial regression model was used to assess individual, interpersonal and structural level factors associated with treatment-seeking for malaria. Overall, 31% of the respondents sought orthodox treatment, 8% sought traditional/herbal treatment and 61% self-medicated as the first response to malaria. At the bivariate level, more males than females used traditional/herbal treatment and self-medicated for malaria. The results of the regression analysis showed that current health insurance status, perceived relative economic standing, level of social support, and locality of residence were associated with seeking alternative treatment for malaria relative to orthodox treatment. The findings show that many urban poor residents in Accra self-medicate as the first response to malaria. Additionally, individuals who were not enrolled in a health insurance scheme, those who perceived they had a low economic standing, those with a high level of social support, and locality of residence were significantly associated with the use of alternative treatment for malaria. Multi-level strategies should be employed to address the use of alternative forms of treatment for malaria within the context of urban poverty.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 136 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 20%
Student > Bachelor 16 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 11%
Researcher 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 40 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 20 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Other 26 19%
Unknown 44 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 July 2019.
All research outputs
#9,075,186
of 15,488,719 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,022
of 4,396 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,081
of 279,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,488,719 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,396 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,765 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them