↓ Skip to main content

The association of GPR85 with PSD-95-neuroligin complex and autism spectrum disorder: a molecular analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, March 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The association of GPR85 with PSD-95-neuroligin complex and autism spectrum disorder: a molecular analysis
Published in
Molecular Autism, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13229-015-0012-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eriko Fujita-Jimbo, Yuko Tanabe, Zhiling Yu, Karin Kojima, Masato Mori, Hong Li, Sadahiko Iwamoto, Takanori Yamagata, Mariko Y Momoi, Takashi Momoi

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has a complex genetic etiology. Some symptoms and mutated genes, including neuroligin (NLGN), neurexin (NRXN), and SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains protein (SHANK), are shared by schizophrenia and ASD. Little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of ASD. One of the possible molecular pathogenesis is an imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory receptors linked with the NLGN-PSD-95-SHANK complex via postsynaptic density protein/Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor/zonula occludens-1 protein (PDZ) binding. In the present study, we focused on GPR85 as a candidate gene for ASD because the C-terminal amino acid sequence of GPR85 [Thr-Cys-Val-Ile (YCVI)] is classified as a type II PDZ-binding motif, and GPR85 is a risk factor for schizophrenia. GPR85 is an orphan receptor that regulates neural and synaptic plasticity and modulates diverse behaviors, including learning and memory. While searching for molecules that associate with GPR85, we found that GPR85 was associated with postsynaptic density protein (PSD)-95 linked with NLGN in the brain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 20%
Neuroscience 11 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 16%
Psychology 7 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 9%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 13 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2015.
All research outputs
#1,895,002
of 4,946,887 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#170
of 230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,799
of 147,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#7
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,946,887 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 60th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 230 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.8. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 147,475 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.