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Exercise performed around MLSS decreases systolic blood pressure and increases aerobic fitness in hypertensive rats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Physiology, January 2015
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Title
Exercise performed around MLSS decreases systolic blood pressure and increases aerobic fitness in hypertensive rats
Published in
BMC Physiology, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12899-015-0015-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bernardo A Petriz, Jeeser A Almeida, Clarissa P C Gomes, Carlos Ernesto, Rinaldo W Pereira, Octavio L Franco

Abstract

Exercise is a non-pharmacologic agent widely used for hypertension control, where low intensity is often associated with blood pressure reduction. Maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) was recently identified in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) as an important step in establishing secure intensities for prescribing exercise for hypertensive phenotypes. Here we verified the effects of training around MLSS, 20% below MLSS, and 15% above MLSS on aerobic fitness and blood pressure status of SHR. Eighteen-week-old SHRs (n = 5, ~ 172.4 ± 8.1 mm Hg systolic blood pressure) were trained on a treadmill for 4 weeks for 30 min/day, 5 days/week at a velocity of 20 m.min(-1). After training, a novel MLSS and incremental test was performed to evaluate the animals' aerobic fitness. Furthermore, ~ 22-week-old SHRs (n = 12, ~169.8 ± 13.8 mm Hg systolic blood pressure) were divided into non-exercised (CG, n = 4), low intensity (LIG, n = 4) and high intensity (HIG, n = 4) groups, where rats were trained at 16 m.min(-1) and 23 m.min(-1) respectively for 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Exercise performed at MLSS enhanced aerobic fitness, leading to a novel MLSS, identified around 30 m.min(-1). Low and high intensity training reduced systolic blood pressure and only high intensity training led to improved aerobic fitness (28.1%, p < 0.01). Therefore, our data indicate a decrease in blood pressure due to low and high exercise intensity, and an increase in aerobic fitness provided by high-intensity exercise in SHRs.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 21%
Student > Master 5 21%
Student > Postgraduate 3 13%
Professor 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 7 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 25%
Sports and Recreations 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 9 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2015.
All research outputs
#4,074,062
of 4,869,893 outputs
Outputs from BMC Physiology
#42
of 49 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,951
of 146,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Physiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,869,893 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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