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Can oral corticosteroids reduce the severity or duration of an acute cough, and the associated National Health Service and societal costs, in adults presenting to primary care? Study protocol for a…

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
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Title
Can oral corticosteroids reduce the severity or duration of an acute cough, and the associated National Health Service and societal costs, in adults presenting to primary care? Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0569-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Harriet E Downing, Fran Carroll, Sara T Brookes, Sandra Hollinghurst, David Timmins, Elizabeth Orton, Kay Wang, Denise Kendrick, Paul Little, Mike V Moore, Anthony Harnden, Matthew Thompson, Margaret T May, Alastair D Hay

Abstract

Acute lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is one of the most common conditions managed internationally and is costly to health services and patients. Despite good evidence that antibiotics are not effective for improving the symptoms of uncomplicated LRTI, they are widely prescribed, contributing to antimicrobial resistance. Many of the symptoms observed in LRTI are mediated by inflammatory processes also observed in exacerbations of asthma, for which there is strong evidence of corticosteroid effectiveness. The primary aim of the OSAC (Oral Steroids for Acute Cough) Trial is to determine whether oral prednisolone (40 mg daily for 5 days) can reduce the duration of moderately bad (or worse) cough and the severity of all its associated symptoms on days 2 to 4 post-randomisation (day 1 is trial entry) by at least 20% in adults ≥18 years with acute LRTI presenting to primary care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 65 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Researcher 8 12%
Student > Master 8 12%
Other 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 18 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2015.
All research outputs
#4,074,444
of 20,185,820 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#1,637
of 5,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,309
of 275,639 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,185,820 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,196 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,639 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them