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Elevated IL-17 levels in semi-immune anaemic mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2018
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Title
Elevated IL-17 levels in semi-immune anaemic mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2257-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gideon Kofi Helegbe, Nguyen Tien Huy, Tetsuo Yanagi, Mohammed Nasir Shuaibu, Mihoko Kikuchi, Mahamoud Sama Cherif, Kenji Hirayama

Abstract

Alterations in inflammatory cytokines and genetic background of the host contribute to the outcome of malaria infection. Despite the promising protective role of IL-17 in infections, little attention is given to further understand its importance in the pathogenesis of severe malaria anaemia in chronic/endemic situations. The objective of this study, therefore, was to evaluate IL-17 levels in anaemic condition and its association with host genetic factors. Two mice strains (Balb/c and CBA) were crossed to get the F1 progeny, and were (F1, Balb/c, CBA) taken through 6 cycles of Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain) infection and chloroquine/pyrimethamine treatment to generate semi-immune status. Cytokine levels and kinetics of antibody production, CD4+CD25+T regulatory cells were evaluated by bead-based multiplex assay kit, ELISA and FACs, respectively. High survival with high Hb loss at significantly low parasitaemia was observed in Balb/c and F1. Furthermore, IgG levels were two times higher in Balb/c, F1 than CBA. While CD4+CD25+ Treg cells were lower in CBA; IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-12α and IL-17 were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in Balb/c, F1. In conclusion, elevated IL-17 levels together with high IL-4, IL-12α and IFN-γ levels may be a marker of protection, and the mechanism may be controlled by host factor (s). Further studies of F2 between the F1 and Balb/c will be informative in evaluating if these genes are segregated or further apart.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 8%
Other 7 28%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 20%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Unspecified 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 5 20%
Unknown 8 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2018.
All research outputs
#8,046,174
of 12,826,501 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,820
of 3,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,916
of 270,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,826,501 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,765 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,815 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them