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Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): a modulator of microglia activity and dendritic spine morphology

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, February 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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77 Dimensions

Readers on

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135 Mendeley
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Title
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): a modulator of microglia activity and dendritic spine morphology
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12974-015-0244-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip K-Y Chang, Armen Khatchadourian, Rebecca Anne McKinney, Dusica Maysinger

Abstract

Recent studies have revealed that excessive activation of microglia and inflammation-mediated neurotoxicity are implicated in the progression of several neurological disorders. In particular, chronic inflammation in vivo and exposure of cultured brain cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro can adversely change microglial morphology and function. This can have both direct and indirect effects on synaptic structures and functions. The integrity of dendritic spines, the postsynaptic component of excitatory synapses, dictates synaptic efficacy. Interestingly, dysgenesis of dendritic spines has been found in many neurological diseases associated with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) deficiency and cognitive decline. In contrast, supplemented ω-3 PUFAs, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), can partly correct spine defects. Hence, we hypothesize that DHA directly affects synaptic integrity and indirectly through neuron-glia interaction. Strong activation of microglia by LPS is accompanied by marked release of nitric oxide and formation of lipid bodies (LBs), both dynamic biomarkers of inflammation. Here we investigated direct effects of DHA on synaptic integrity and its indirect effects via microglia in the hippocampal CA1 region.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 134 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 24%
Student > Master 22 16%
Researcher 20 15%
Student > Bachelor 20 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 14 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 24%
Neuroscience 28 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 10%
Chemistry 6 4%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 19 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,336,378
of 6,348,733 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#340
of 901 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,520
of 164,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#15
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,348,733 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 901 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,293 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.