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Contact among healthcare workers in the hospital setting: developing the evidence base for innovative approaches to infection control

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
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Title
Contact among healthcare workers in the hospital setting: developing the evidence base for innovative approaches to infection control
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3093-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Krista M. English, Joanne M. Langley, Allison McGeer, Nathaniel Hupert, Raymond Tellier, Bonnie Henry, Scott A. Halperin, Lynn Johnston, Babak Pourbohloul

Abstract

Nosocomial, or healthcare-associated infections (HAI), exact a high medical and financial toll on patients, healthcare workers, caretakers, and the health system. Interpersonal contact patterns play a large role in infectious disease spread, but little is known about the relationship between health care workers' (HCW) movements and contact patterns within a heath care facility and HAI. Quantitatively capturing these patterns will aid in understanding the dynamics of HAI and may lead to more targeted and effective control strategies in the hospital setting. Staff at 3 urban university-based tertiary care hospitals in Canada completed a detailed questionnaire on demographics, interpersonal contacts, in-hospital movement, and infection prevention and control practices. Staff were divided into categories of administrative/support, nurses, physicians, and "Other HCWs" - a fourth distinct category, which excludes physicians and nurses. Using quantitative network modeling tools, we constructed the resulting HCW "co-location network" to illustrate contacts among different occupations and with locations in hospital settings. Among 3048 respondents (response rate 38%) an average of 3.79, 3.69 and 3.88 floors were visited by each HCW each week in the 3 hospitals, with a standard deviation of 2.63, 1.74 and 2.08, respectively. Physicians reported the highest rate of direct patient contacts (> 20 patients/day) but the lowest rate of contacts with other HCWs; nurses had the most extended (> 20 min) periods of direct patient contact. "Other HCWs" had the most direct daily contact with all other HCWs. Physicians also reported significantly more locations visited per week than nurses, other HCW, or administrators; nurses visited the fewest. Public spaces such as the cafeteria had the most staff visits per week, but the least mean hours spent per visit. Inpatient settings had significantly more HCW interactions per week than outpatient settings. HCW contact patterns and spatial movement demonstrate significant heterogeneity by occupation. Control strategies that address this diversity among health care workers may be more effective than "one-strategy-fits-all" HAI prevention and control programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 18%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 15 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Mathematics 2 4%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 16 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2018.
All research outputs
#4,595,345
of 17,837,438 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,270
of 6,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,062
of 288,239 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,837,438 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,239 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them