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Frequency and correlates of malaria over-treatment in areas of differing malaria transmission: a cross-sectional study in rural Western Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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85 Mendeley
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Title
Frequency and correlates of malaria over-treatment in areas of differing malaria transmission: a cross-sectional study in rural Western Kenya
Published in
Malaria Journal, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0613-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frankline M Onchiri, Patricia B Pavlinac, Benson O Singa, Jacqueline M Naulikha, Elizabeth A Odundo, Carey Farquhar, Barbra A Richardson, Grace John-Stewart, Judd L Walson

Abstract

In 2010, the World Health Organization shifted its malaria guidelines from recommending the empiric treatment of all febrile children to treating only those with laboratory-confirmed malaria. This study evaluated the frequency and predictors of malaria over-treatment among febrile malaria-negative children in Kenya. Between 2012 and 2013, 1,362 children presenting consecutively with temperature ≥37.5°C to Kisii and Homa Bay hospitals were enrolled in a cross-sectional study evaluating causes of fever. Children were screened for malaria using smear microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests and managed according to standard of care at the hospitals. The frequency of anti-malarial prescriptions among children with laboratory-confirmed malaria negative children (malaria over-treatment) was determined; and clinical and demographic correlates of overtreatment evaluated using logistic regression. Because of differences in malaria endemicity, analyses were stratified and compared by site. Among 1,362 children enrolled, 46 (7%) of 685 children in Kisii, and 310 (45.8%) of 677 in Homa Bay had laboratory-confirmed malaria; p < 0.001. Among malaria-negative children; 210 (57.2%) in Homa Bay and 45 (7.0%) in Kisii received anti-malarials; p < 0.001. Predictors of over-treatment in Homa Bay included ≥ one integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) danger sign (aOR = 8.47; 95% CI: 4.81-14.89), fever lasting ≥ seven days (aOR = 4.94; 95% CI: 1.90-12.86), and fever ≥39°C (aOR = 3.07; 95% CI: 1.58-5.96). In Kisii, only fever ≥39°C predicted over-treatment (aOR = 2.13; 95% CI: 1.02-4.45). Malaria over-treatment was common, particularly in Homa Bay, where the prevalence of malaria was extremely high. Severe illness and high or prolonged fever were associated with overtreatment. Overtreatment may result in failure to treat other serious causes of fever, drug resistance, and unnecessarily treatment costs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Burkina Faso 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 82 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 28%
Researcher 15 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 10 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 13%
Social Sciences 9 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 14 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2016.
All research outputs
#6,359,370
of 12,440,542 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,782
of 3,643 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,476
of 219,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#15
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,440,542 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,643 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 219,602 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.