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Experimental infection with equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) induces chorioretinal lesions.

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, December 2013
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Title
Experimental infection with equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) induces chorioretinal lesions.
Published in
Veterinary Research, December 2013
DOI 10.1186/1297-9716-44-118
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hussey GS, Goehring LS, Lunn DP, Hussey SB, Huang T, Osterrieder N, Powell C, Hand J, Holz C, Slater J

Abstract

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalitis (EHM) remains one of the most devastating manifestations of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection but our understanding of its pathogenesis remains rudimentary, partly because of a lack of adequate experimental models. EHV-1 infection of the ocular vasculature may offer an alternative model as EHV-1-induced chorioretinopathy appears to occur in a significant number of horses, and the pathogenesis of EHM and ocular EHV-1 may be similar. To investigate the potential of ocular EHV-1 as a model for EHM, and to determine the frequency of ocular EHV-1, our goal was to study: (1) Dissemination of virus following acute infection, (2) Development and frequency of ocular lesions following infection, and (3) Utility of a GFP-expressing virus for localization of the virus in vivo. Viral antigen could be detected following acute infection in ocular tissues and the central nervous system (experiment 1). Furthermore, EHV-1 infection resulted in multifocal choroidal lesions in 90% (experiment 2) and 50% (experiment 3) of experimentally infected horses, however ocular lesions did not appear in vivo until between 3 weeks and 3 months post-infection. Taken together, the timing of the appearance of lesions and their ophthalmoscopic features suggest that their pathogenesis may involve ischemic injury to the chorioretina following viremic delivery of virus to the eye, mirroring the vascular events that result in EHM. In summary, we show that the frequency of ocular EHV-1 is 50-90% following experimental infection making this model attractive for testing future vaccines or therapeutics in an immunologically relevant age group.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Other 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 10 22%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 16 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2014.
All research outputs
#3,106,041
of 4,095,521 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#325
of 373 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,030
of 122,853 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#31
of 32 outputs
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