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Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome in a patient with Japanese encephalitis: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, October 2017
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Title
Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome in a patient with Japanese encephalitis: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13256-017-1454-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Subatharshini Sountharalingam, H. M. M. T. B. Herath, Dharshana Wijegunasinghe, Sunethra Senanayke

Abstract

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome is a rare neurological disorder that usually manifests as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. Although some viruses are reported to cause this condition, opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome by Japanese encephalitis has not been reported previously. Here we present the case of a 31-year-old Sri Lankan woman who presented with fever, altered level of consciousness, opsoclonus, and facial myoclonus. She was diagnosed as having Japanese encephalitis based on cerebrospinal fluid and serum Japanese encephalitis-specific immunoglobulin M antibody and characteristic magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. She was given intravenously administered methylprednisolone pulses (1000 mg per day) for 5 days. With this she improved gradually with reduction in opsoclonus and myoclonic movements. Her limb muscle power and speech also improved slowly. We intended to highlight the fact that opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome can be a feature of infection with Japanese encephalitis and that it can be added to the list of viruses which cause opsoclonus. Currently there is no well-accepted treatment for opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome and intravenously administered methylprednisolone pulses and immunosuppressants can be used successfully in these patients for early recovery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 23%
Researcher 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Librarian 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 15%
Psychology 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Neuroscience 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2018.
All research outputs
#10,240,384
of 12,826,501 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#1,175
of 2,119 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,347
of 269,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 2,119 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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