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Different adiposity indices and their association with blood pressure and hypertension in middle-aged urban black South African men and women: findings from the AWI-GEN South African Soweto Site

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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10 Dimensions

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Different adiposity indices and their association with blood pressure and hypertension in middle-aged urban black South African men and women: findings from the AWI-GEN South African Soweto Site
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5443-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pedro T. Pisa, Lisa K. Micklesfield, Juliana Kagura, Michele Ramsay, Nigel J. Crowther, Shane A. Norris

Abstract

To report associations between different adiposity indices [anthropometric and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measures] and blood pressure (BP) and hypertension in urban black South African adults. Anthropometric and DXA whole body measures were performed on 1026 men and 982 women. Participants were classified as being hypertensive if they had a systolic BP (SBP) ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic (DBP) ≥ 90 mmHg. Within each gender the relationship of adiposity with BP and hypertension risk was assessed using linear and logistic regression models respectively. Bivariate models were computed for each body composition variable. Furthermore, we computed a multiple regression model to illustrates how body composition parameters are associated with the outcome variables independent of each other. The males were significantly taller and had a higher fat free soft tissue mass (FFSTM), DBP and socio-economic status, and were more likely to use tobacco and be hypertensive (48.0% vs. 38.8%). The females had higher body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), fat mass (FM), subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), FM/FFSTM ratio and body fat % than males. All body composition parameters were positively associated with hypertension. In both males and females, the FM/FFSTM ratio associated the strongest with hypertension illustrating the following odds ratios [males: 70.37 (18.47, 268.16) p ≤ 0.001; females 2.48 (0.86,7.21) p = 0.09]. The multiple regression model, indicated that the VAT and WC significantly associated with both SBP and DBP in the men and women respectively, whilst WC was the only significant predictor for hypertension. All body composition parameters were associated with hypertension and FM/FFSTM ratio showed the strongest relationship. It was reassuring that WC remains a useful measure of central adiposity that can be used as a risk indicator for hypertension if more sophisticated measures are not available. Furthermore, our data in part, implies that reducing abdominal adiposity in aging adults could contribute to reducing the risk of elevated blood pressure and hypertension.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 12%
Student > Master 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 20 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 10%
Mathematics 4 7%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 22 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2018.
All research outputs
#2,944,148
of 12,826,501 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,032
of 8,738 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,344
of 269,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,826,501 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,738 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,690 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them