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Extended brief intervention to address alcohol misuse in people with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities living in the community (EBI-ID): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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104 Mendeley
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Title
Extended brief intervention to address alcohol misuse in people with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities living in the community (EBI-ID): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0629-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christos Kouimtsidis, Lucy Fodor-Wynne, Katrina Scior, Rachael Hunter, Gianluca Baio, Vittoria Pezzoni, Angela Hassiotis

Abstract

There is some evidence that people with intellectual disabilities who live in the community are exposed to the same risks of alcohol use as the rest of the population. Various interventions have been evaluated in the general population to tackle hazardous or harmful drinking and alcohol dependence, but the literature evaluating interventions is very limited regarding intellectual disabilities. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommends that brief and extended brief interventions be used to help young persons and adults who have screened as positive for hazardous and harmful drinking. The objective of this trial is to investigate the feasibility of adapting and delivering an extended brief intervention (EBI) to persons with mild/moderate intellectual disability who live in the community and whose level of drinking is harmful or hazardous. The study has three stages, which include the adaptation of the Extended Brief Intervention (EBI) for people with intellectual disability, a single blind, randomised controlled trial of an individual Extended Brief Intervention to test the feasibility of the intervention, and a qualitative study that will assess the perceived acceptability and usefulness of the intervention. Fifty participants in total will be recruited from community intellectual disability services and social care or third sector organisations. The main outcome is a reduction in alcohol consumption measured by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Alcohol misuse is a relatively under-researched mental health problem in people with intellectual disabilities. Therefore, the study addresses both diagnostic issues and the delivery of a simple first stage intervention, which is available to the population of average intelligence and young persons in particular. The findings from the study will guide the preparation of a large-scale study to test whether this treatment is clinically and cost-effective in this population. ISRCTN58783633 (19 December 2013).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 103 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 17%
Student > Master 14 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 10%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 28 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 18%
Social Sciences 10 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 8%
Arts and Humanities 2 2%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 35 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2016.
All research outputs
#4,650,747
of 15,918,909 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#1,812
of 4,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,563
of 226,384 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,918,909 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,204 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,384 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them