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Mixed methods feasibility study for a trial of blood pressure telemonitoring for people who have had stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA)

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
96 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Mixed methods feasibility study for a trial of blood pressure telemonitoring for people who have had stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
Published in
Trials, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0628-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janet Hanley, Peter Fairbrother, Ashma Krishan, Lucy McCloughan, Paul Padfield, Mary Paterson, Hilary Pinnock, Aziz Sheikh, Cathie Sudlow, Allison Todd, Brian McKinstry

Abstract

Good blood pressure (BP) control reduces the risk of recurrence of stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Although there is strong evidence that BP telemonitoring helps achieve good control, none of the major trials have considered the effectiveness in stroke/TIA survivors. We therefore conducted a feasibility study for a trial of BP telemonitoring for stroke/ TIA survivors with uncontrolled BP in primary care. Phase 1 was a pilot trial involving 55 patients stratified by stroke/TIA randomised 3:1 to BP telemonitoring for 6 months or usual care. Phase 2 was a qualitative evaluation and comprised semi-structured interviews with 16 trial participants who received telemonitoring and 3 focus groups with 23 members of stroke support groups and 7 carers. Overall, 125 patients (60 stroke patients, 65 TIA patients) were approached and 55 (44%) patients were randomised including 27 stroke patients and 28 TIA patients. Fifty-two participants (95%) attended the 6-month follow-up appointment, but one declined the second daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) measurement resulting in a 93% completion rate for ABPM - the proposed primary outcome measure for a full trial. Adherence to telemonitoring was good; of the 40 participants who were telemonitoring, 38 continued to provide readings throughout the 6 months. There was a mean reduction of 10.1 mmHg in systolic ABPM in the telemonitoring group compared with 3.8 mmHg in the control group, which suggested the potential for a substantial effect from telemonitoring. Our qualitative analysis found that many stroke patients were concerned about their BP and telemonitoring increased their engagement, was easy, convenient and reassuring CONCLUSIONS: A full-scale trial is feasible, likely to recruit well and have good rates of compliance and follow-up. ISRCTN61528726 15/12/2011.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 96 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 20%
Researcher 14 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 24 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 14%
Neuroscience 8 8%
Social Sciences 7 7%
Psychology 6 6%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 28 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2015.
All research outputs
#1,867,956
of 5,017,282 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#650
of 1,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,480
of 147,809 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#36
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,017,282 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 62nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,657 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 147,809 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.