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Risk-based inspection as a cost-effective strategy to reduce human exposure to cysticerci of Taenia saginata in low-prevalence settings

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, April 2018
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1 tweeter

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Risk-based inspection as a cost-effective strategy to reduce human exposure to cysticerci of Taenia saginata in low-prevalence settings
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13071-018-2839-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bhagyalakshmi Chengat Prakashbabu, Laura Rebecca Marshall, Matteo Crotta, William Gilbert, Jade Cherry Johnson, Lis Alban, Javier Guitian

Abstract

Taenia saginata cysticercus is the larval stage of the zoonotic parasite Taenia saginata, with a life-cycle involving both cattle and humans. The public health impact is considered low. The current surveillance system, based on post-mortem inspection of carcasses has low sensitivity and leads to considerable economic burden. Therefore, in the interests of public health and food production efficiency, this study aims to explore the potential of risk-based and cost-effective meat inspection activities for the detection and control of T. saginata cysticercus in low prevalence settings. Building on the findings of a study on risk factors for T. saginata cysticercus infection in cattle in Great Britain, we simulated scenarios using a stochastic scenario tree model, where animals are allocated to different risk categories based on their age, sex and movement history. These animals underwent different types of meat inspection (alternative or current) depending on their risk category. Expert elicitation was conducted to assess feasibility of scenarios and provide data for economic analysis. The cost-effectiveness of these scenarios was calculated as an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, using the number of infected carcasses detected as the technical outcome. Targeting the high-risk population with more incisions into the heart while abandoning incisions into the masseter muscles was found to reduce the total number of inspections and cost, while simultaneously increasing the number of infected carcasses found. The results suggest that, under reasonable assumptions regarding potential improvements to current inspection methods, a more efficient and sensitive meat inspection system could be used on animals categorised according to their risk of harbouring T. saginata cysticercus at slaughter. Such a system could reduce associated cost to the beef industry and lower microbial contamination of beef products, improving public health outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 15%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 14 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 12 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 13 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2018.
All research outputs
#8,047,808
of 12,829,119 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,917
of 3,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,093
of 269,556 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,829,119 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,345 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,556 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them