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Survival after laparoscopic and open surgery for colon cancer: a comparative, single-institution study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Surgery, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Survival after laparoscopic and open surgery for colon cancer: a comparative, single-institution study
Published in
BMC Surgery, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12893-015-0013-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fabio Cianchi, Giacomo Trallori, Beatrice Mallardi, Giuseppe Macrì, Maria Rosa Biagini, Gabriele Lami, Giampiero Indennitate, Siro Bagnoli, Andrea Bonanomi, Luca Messerini, Benedetta Badii, Fabio Staderini, Ileana Skalamera, Giulia Fiorenza, Giuliano Perigli

Abstract

Some recent studies have suggested that laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer may provide a potential survival advantage when compared with open surgery. This study aimed to compare cancer-related survivals of patients who underwent laparoscopic or open resection of colon cancer in the same, high volume tertiary center. Patients who had undergone elective open or laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer between January 2002 and December 2010 were analyzed. A clinical database was prospectively compiled. Survival analysis was calculated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 460 resections were performed. There were no significant differences between the laparoscopic (n = 227) and the open group (n = 233) apart from tumor stage: stage I tumors were more frequent in the laparoscopic group whereas stage II tumors were more frequent in the open group. The mean number of harvested lymph nodes was significantly higher in the laparoscopic than in the open group (20.0 ± 0.7 vs 14.2 ± 0.5, P < 0.01). The 5-year cancer-related survival for patients undergoing laparoscopic resection was significantly higher than that following open resections (83.1% vs 68.5%, P = 0.01). By performing a stage-to-stage comparison, we found that the improvement in survival in the laparoscopic group occurred mainly in patients with stage II tumors. Our study shows a survival advantage for patients who had undergone laparoscopic surgery for stage II colon cancer. This may be correlated with a higher number of harvested lymph nodes and thus a better stage stratification of these patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 26%
Student > Bachelor 6 19%
Student > Master 4 13%
Other 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2015.
All research outputs
#2,195,039
of 8,596,331 outputs
Outputs from BMC Surgery
#58
of 340 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,829
of 202,785 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Surgery
#3
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,596,331 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 340 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,785 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.