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Barriers to and motivators of handwashing behavior among mothers of neonates in rural Bangladesh

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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135 Mendeley
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Title
Barriers to and motivators of handwashing behavior among mothers of neonates in rural Bangladesh
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5365-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shahana Parveen, Sharifa Nasreen, Jelena V. Allen, Kelly B. Kamm, Shifat Khan, Shirina Akter, Tajnin Marin Lopa, K. Zaman, Shams El Arifeen, Stephen P. Luby, Pavani K. Ram

Abstract

To design a maternal handwashing intervention for the newborn period, this qualitative study explored drivers of handwashing among mothers and other caregivers of neonates and infants in two rural areas of Bangladesh. We conducted 40 semi-structured observation sessions to observe handwashing behaviors of primiparous and multiparous mothers of neonates, and to understand the contextual factors that facilitated or hampered those behaviors. We then conducted 64 interviews with mothers of neonates and mothers of infants and 6 group discussions with mothers of infants, other female caregivers and fathers to explore perceptions, beliefs, and practices related to handwashing in the neonatal period. Based on a conceptual model and the Theory of Reasoned Action/Theory of Planned Behavior, we developed a conceptual model a priori, we performed thematic analysis to explain determinants of maternal handwashing behaviors. We conducted 200 h of observation among mothers of neonates. The age range of participating mothers varied between 17 and 25 years and their maximum education was up to 10th grade of schooling. Mothers, other female caregivers and fathers perceived a need to wash hands with or without soap before eating or before feeding a child by hand to prevent diarrhea. Mothers expressed the importance of washing their hands before holding a baby but were rarely observed doing so. All respondents prioritized using soap for visible dirt or feces; otherwise, water alone was considered sufficient. Lack of family support, social norms of infrequent handwashing, perceptions of frequent contact with water as a health threat and mothers' restricted movement during first 40 days of neonate's life, and childcare and household responsibilities adversely impacted handwashing behavior. Addressing emotive drivers of handwashing within existing social norms by engaging family members, ensuring handwashing facilities and clarifying neonatal health threats may improve maternal handwashing behavior in the neonatal period.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Romania 1 <1%
Unknown 134 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 15%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Researcher 13 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 42 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 27 20%
Social Sciences 13 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 9%
Psychology 12 9%
Environmental Science 5 4%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 47 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2018.
All research outputs
#4,933,315
of 20,499,974 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,882
of 13,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,451
of 294,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,499,974 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,372 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,112 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them