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Systematic review of sedentary behaviour and health indicators in school-aged children and youth

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#40 of 1,682)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
policy
4 policy sources
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
1098 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1439 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Systematic review of sedentary behaviour and health indicators in school-aged children and youth
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-8-98
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark S Tremblay, Allana G LeBlanc, Michelle E Kho, Travis J Saunders, Richard Larouche, Rachel C Colley, Gary Goldfield, Sarah Gorber

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests that, independent of physical activity levels, sedentary behaviours are associated with increased risk of cardio-metabolic disease, all-cause mortality, and a variety of physiological and psychological problems. Therefore, the purpose of this systematic review is to determine the relationship between sedentary behaviour and health indicators in school-aged children and youth aged 5-17 years. Online databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO), personal libraries and government documents were searched for relevant studies examining time spent engaging in sedentary behaviours and six specific health indicators (body composition, fitness, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, self-esteem, pro-social behaviour and academic achievement). 232 studies including 983,840 participants met inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Television (TV) watching was the most common measure of sedentary behaviour and body composition was the most common outcome measure. Qualitative analysis of all studies revealed a dose-response relation between increased sedentary behaviour and unfavourable health outcomes. Watching TV for more than 2 hours per day was associated with unfavourable body composition, decreased fitness, lowered scores for self-esteem and pro-social behaviour and decreased academic achievement. Meta-analysis was completed for randomized controlled studies that aimed to reduce sedentary time and reported change in body mass index (BMI) as their primary outcome. In this regard, a meta-analysis revealed an overall significant effect of -0.81 (95% CI of -1.44 to -0.17, p = 0.01) indicating an overall decrease in mean BMI associated with the interventions. There is a large body of evidence from all study designs which suggests that decreasing any type of sedentary time is associated with lower health risk in youth aged 5-17 years. In particular, the evidence suggests that daily TV viewing in excess of 2 hours is associated with reduced physical and psychosocial health, and that lowering sedentary time leads to reductions in BMI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,439 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 5 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Indonesia 3 <1%
United States 3 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Malaysia 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Korea, Republic of 2 <1%
Other 13 <1%
Unknown 1401 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 290 20%
Student > Bachelor 234 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 225 16%
Researcher 131 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 112 8%
Other 257 18%
Unknown 190 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 293 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 257 18%
Social Sciences 151 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 142 10%
Psychology 94 7%
Other 224 16%
Unknown 278 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 149. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2020.
All research outputs
#159,530
of 17,896,489 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#40
of 1,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#641
of 111,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,896,489 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,682 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 111,445 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.