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Tuberculosis active case finding: uptake and diagnostic yield among minibus drivers in urban South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2015
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Title
Tuberculosis active case finding: uptake and diagnostic yield among minibus drivers in urban South Africa
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1592-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tonderai Mabuto, Ephraim Zwane, Violet Chihota, Gillian Gresak, Salome Charalambous, Gavin J Churchyard, Christopher J Hoffmann

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) active case finding is a part of TB control in areas of higher TB prevalence. Congested public transportation settings may be areas of increased TB transmission. We evaluated the uptake and diagnostic yield of an active TB screening program among minibus drivers in a large public transportation facility in Johannesburg, South Africa. Over an eight month period, we intensively recruited minibus drivers for TB screening with a goal of 80% uptake among the estimated 2000 drivers. All participants were screened for TB symptoms, offered HIV testing, and had sputum collected for smear microscopy and liquid culture. 686 drivers were screened for TB, representing an uptake of only 34% of all drivers (43% of the target screening). Ten drivers (1.5%) were culture positive for TB, nine of whom were sputum smear microscopy negative. Factors associated with previously undiagnosed TB included a history of incarceration (odds ratio [OR] 5.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 27.3) and HIV positivity (OR 5.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 26.3). We identified undiagnosed pulmonary TB cases among drivers but at a level that may be insufficient to justify systematic case finding in this population considering the poor uptake.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 81 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 30%
Student > Master 19 23%
Student > Postgraduate 7 8%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 4 5%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 13 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 21%
Social Sciences 14 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Environmental Science 3 4%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 14 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2015.
All research outputs
#4,094,769
of 4,895,294 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,073
of 5,444 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,923
of 145,739 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#215
of 232 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,895,294 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,444 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 145,739 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 232 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.