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Associations between e-cigarette access and smoking and drinking behaviours in teenagers

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
23 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
89 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
162 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Associations between e-cigarette access and smoking and drinking behaviours in teenagers
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1618-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Hughes, Mark A Bellis, Katherine A Hardcastle, Philip McHale, Andrew Bennett, Robin Ireland, Kate Pike

Abstract

Public health concerns regarding e-cigarettes and debate on appropriate regulatory responses are focusing on the need to prevent child access to these devices. However, little is currently known about the characteristics of those young people that are accessing e-cigarettes. Using a cross-sectional survey of 14-17 year old school students in North West England (n = 16,193) we examined associations between e-cigarette access and demographics, conventional smoking behaviours, alcohol consumption, and methods of accessing cigarettes and alcohol. Access to e-cigarettes was identified through a question asking students if they had ever tried or purchased e-cigarettes. One in five participants reported having accessed e-cigarettes (19.2%). Prevalence was highest among smokers (rising to 75.8% in those smoking >5 per day), although 15.8% of teenagers that had accessed e-cigarettes had never smoked conventional cigarettes (v.13.6% being ex-smokers). E-cigarette access was independently associated with male gender, having parents/guardians that smoke and students' alcohol use. Compared with non-drinkers, teenagers that drank alcohol at least weekly and binge drank were more likely to have accessed e-cigarettes (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.89, P < 0.001), with this association particularly strong among never-smokers (AOR 4.59, P < 0.001). Among drinkers, e-cigarette access was related to: drinking to get drunk, alcohol-related violence, consumption of spirits; self-purchase of alcohol from shops or supermarkets; and accessing alcohol by recruiting adult proxy purchasers outside shops. There is an urgent need for controls on the promotion and sale of e-cigarettes to children. Findings suggest that e-cigarettes are being accessed by teenagers more for experimentation than smoking cessation. Those most likely to access e-cigarettes may already be familiar with illicit methods of accessing age-restricted substances.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 155 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 18%
Researcher 26 16%
Other 14 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 9%
Student > Bachelor 13 8%
Other 26 16%
Unknown 40 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 13%
Psychology 20 12%
Social Sciences 16 10%
Environmental Science 5 3%
Other 21 13%
Unknown 45 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 224. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2018.
All research outputs
#96,705
of 18,217,940 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#82
of 12,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,428
of 233,183 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,217,940 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,253 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,183 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them