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Modular assembly of transposable element arrays by microsatellite targeting in the guayule and rice genomes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
Modular assembly of transposable element arrays by microsatellite targeting in the guayule and rice genomes
Published in
BMC Genomics, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-4653-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

José A. Valdes Franco, Yi Wang, Naxin Huo, Grisel Ponciano, Howard A. Colvin, Colleen M. McMahan, Yong Q. Gu, William R. Belknap

Abstract

Guayule (Parthenium argentatum A. Gray) is a rubber-producing desert shrub native to Mexico and the United States. Guayule represents an alternative to Hevea brasiliensis as a source for commercial natural rubber. The efficient application of modern molecular/genetic tools to guayule improvement requires characterization of its genome. The 1.6 Gb guayule genome was sequenced, assembled and annotated. The final 1.5 Gb assembly, while fragmented (N50 = 22 kb), maps > 95% of the shotgun reads and is essentially complete. Approximately 40,000 transcribed, protein encoding genes were annotated on the assembly. Further characterization of this genome revealed 15 families of small, microsatellite-associated, transposable elements (TEs) with unexpected chromosomal distribution profiles. These SaTar (Satellite Targeted) elements, which are non-autonomous Mu-like elements (MULEs), were frequently observed in multimeric linear arrays of unrelated individual elements within which no individual element is interrupted by another. This uniformly non-nested TE multimer architecture has not been previously described in either eukaryotic or prokaryotic genomes. Five families of similarly distributed non-autonomous MULEs (microsatellite associated, modularly assembled) were characterized in the rice genome. Families of TEs with similar structures and distribution profiles were identified in sorghum and citrus. The sequencing and assembly of the guayule genome provides a foundation for application of current crop improvement technologies to this plant. In addition, characterization of this genome revealed SaTar elements with distribution profiles unique among TEs. Satar targeting appears based on an alternative MULE recombination mechanism with the potential to impact gene evolution.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 28%
Student > Master 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 5 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Environmental Science 1 6%
Computer Science 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 5 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2021.
All research outputs
#1,877,730
of 18,096,829 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#668
of 9,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,948
of 287,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,096,829 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,529 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,317 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.