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Three and six grams supplementation of d-aspartic acid in resistance trained men

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 869)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

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23 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
46 tweeters
facebook
13 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
1 Redditor
video
8 video uploaders

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Three and six grams supplementation of d-aspartic acid in resistance trained men
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
DOI 10.1186/s12970-015-0078-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Geoffrey W Melville, Jason C Siegler, Paul WM Marshall

Abstract

Although abundant research has investigated the hormonal effects of d-aspartic acid in rat models, to date there is limited research on humans. Previous research has demonstrated increased total testosterone levels in sedentary men and no significant changes in hormonal levels in resistance trained men. It was hypothesised that a higher dosage may be required for experienced lifters, thus this study investigated the effects of two different dosages of d-aspartic acid on basal hormonal levels in resistance trained men and explored responsiveness to d-aspartic acid based on initial testosterone levels. Twenty-four males, with a minimum of two years' experience in resistance training, (age, 24.5 ± 3.2 y; training experience, 3.4 ± 1.4 y; height, 178.5 ± 6.5 cm; weight, 84.7 ± 7.2 kg; bench press 1-RM, 105.3 ± 15.2 kg) were randomised into one of three groups: 6 g.d(-1) plain flour (D0); 3 g.d(-1) of d-aspartic acid (D3); and 6 g.d(-1) of d-aspartic acid (D6). Participants performed a two-week washout period, training four days per week. This continued through the experimental period (14 days), with participants consuming the supplement in the morning. Serum was analysed for levels of testosterone, estradiol, sex hormone binding globulin, albumin and free testosterone was determined by calculation. D-aspartic acid supplementation revealed no main effect for group in: estradiol; sex-hormone-binding-globulin; and albumin. Total testosterone was significantly reduced in D6 (P = 0.03). Analysis of free testosterone showed that D6 was significantly reduced as compared to D0 (P = 0.005), but not significantly different to D3. Analysis did not reveal any significant differences between D3 and D0. No significant correlation between initial total testosterone levels and responsiveness to d-aspartic acid was observed (r = 0.10, P = 0.70). The present study demonstrated that a daily dose of six grams of d-aspartic acid decreased levels of total testosterone and free testosterone (D6), without any concurrent change in other hormones measured. Three grams of d-aspartic acid had no significant effect on either testosterone markers. It is currently unknown what effect this reduction in testosterone will have on strength and hypertrophy gains.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 54 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Master 7 13%
Lecturer 4 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 14 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 8 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 16 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 237. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2022.
All research outputs
#118,717
of 21,777,067 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#45
of 869 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,457
of 241,910 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,777,067 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 869 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 55.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,910 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them