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Barriers to adherence with tuberculosis contact investigation in six provinces of Vietnam: a nested case–control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

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140 Mendeley
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Title
Barriers to adherence with tuberculosis contact investigation in six provinces of Vietnam: a nested case–control study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0816-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gregory James Fox, Le Phuong Loan, Nguyen Viet Nhung, Nguyen Thi Loi, Dinh Ngoc Sy, Warwick John Britton, Guy Barrington Marks

Abstract

Close contacts of patients with tuberculosis (TB) have a substantial risk of developing the disease, particularly during the first year after exposure. Household contact investigation has recently been recommended as a strategy to enhance case detection in high-burden countries. However the barriers to its implementation in these settings remain poorly understood. A nested case-control study was conducted in Vietnam within the context of a large cluster randomised controlled trial of active screening for TB in household contacts of patients with pulmonary TB. The study population comprised contacts (and their index patients) from 12 Districts in six provinces throughout the country. Cases were contacts (and their index patients) that did not attend the scheduled screening appointment. Controls were those who did attend. We assessed relevant knowledge, attitudes and practices in cases and controls. The acceptability of contact investigation was high among both cases (n = 109) and controls (n = 194). Both cases (47%) and controls (36%) commonly reported discrimination against people with TB. Cases were less likely than controls to understand that sharing sleeping quarters with a TB patient increased their risk of disease (OR 0.46, 0.27 - 0.78) or recognise TB as an infectious disease (OR 0.65, 0.39 - 1.08). A higher proportion of cases than controls held the mistaken traditional belief that a non-infectious form of TB caused the disease (OR 1.69, 1.02 - 2.78). The knowledge, attitudes and practices of contacts and TB patients influence their ongoing participation in contact investigation. TB case detection policies in high-prevalence settings can be strengthened by systematically evaluating and addressing locally important barriers to attendance. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12610000600044 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 137 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 21%
Researcher 25 18%
Student > Bachelor 22 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 9%
Student > Postgraduate 10 7%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 25 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 4%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 30 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2015.
All research outputs
#7,762,447
of 12,373,180 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,536
of 4,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,934
of 221,875 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,180 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,592 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,875 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.