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Excretion of urinary histamine and N-tele methylhistamine in patients with gastrointestinal food allergy compared to non-allergic controls during an unrestricted diet and a hypoallergenic diet

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, April 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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1 patent

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Excretion of urinary histamine and N-tele methylhistamine in patients with gastrointestinal food allergy compared to non-allergic controls during an unrestricted diet and a hypoallergenic diet
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12876-015-0268-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin Raithel, Alexander Hagel, Heinz Albrecht, Yurdaguel Zopf, Andreas Naegel, Hanns-Wolf Baenkler, Fred Buchwald, Hans-Wolfgang Schultis, Juergen Kressel, Eckhart Georg Hahn, Peter Konturek

Abstract

Patients with gastrointestinal food allergy are characterised by increased production of mast cell derived mediators upon allergen contact and present often with unspecific symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate urinary histamine and methylhistamine excretion in patients with food allergy and to compare their values with food-tolerant controls. In a retrospective case control study the urinary excretion parameters were analysed from 56 patients (40.9, 19 - 58 years) in whom later food challenge tests confirmed food allergy. During their diagnostic work-up urine was collected during a 12-h period under an unrestricted diet with staple foods and a hypoallergenic potato-rice-diet (each 2 days). Healthy controls underwent the same diet types to define normal excretion parameters. Urinary histamine and n-methylhistamine were determined by ELISA or tandem mass spectrometry, respectively, and were expressed as median (25 - 75% range, μg/mmol creatinine x m(2)BSA). During unrestricted diet urinary histamine was significantly higher in gastrointestinal food allergy than healthy controls (1.42, 0.9 - 2.7 vs 0.87, 0.4 - 1.3; p < 0.0001), while the difference between both groups became marginal during potato-rice diet (1.30, 0.7 - 2.1 vs 1.05, 0.5 - 1.5; p = 0.02). N-methylhistamine was found to be significantly elevated in gastrointestinal food allergy both during unrestricted diet (7.1, 5.0 - 11.2) and potato-rice diet (5.7, 3.7 - 8.7) compared to controls (p < 0.0001). Interestingly, urinary methylhistamine excretion (p < 0.004) and clinical symptom score (p < 0.02) fell significantly when the diet was switched from unrestricted to hypoallergenic food, but was not correlated with symptom scores. In gastrointestinal food allergy significantly higher levels of urine histamine and methylhistamine excretion were found under unrestricted diet, reflecting an increased secretion of histamine due to offending foods. Measurement of urinary n-methylhistamine levels may help to find out patients with increased histamine production and/or food-allergen induced clinical symptoms, respectively.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 14%
Chemistry 3 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 5%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2020.
All research outputs
#4,344,256
of 17,822,916 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#198
of 1,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,716
of 233,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,822,916 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,194 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,705 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them