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Global epidemiology of type 1 diabetes in young adults and adults: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters

Citations

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133 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
335 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Global epidemiology of type 1 diabetes in young adults and adults: a systematic review
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1591-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paula A Diaz-Valencia, Pierre Bougnères, Alain-Jacques Valleron

Abstract

Although type 1 diabetes (T1D) can affect patients of all ages, most epidemiological studies of T1D focus on disease forms with clinical diagnosis during childhood and adolescence. Clinically, adult T1D is difficult to discriminate from certain forms of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and from Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA). A systematic review of the literature was performed to retrieve original papers in English, French and Spanish published up to November 6, 2014, reporting the incidence of T1D among individuals aged over 15 years. The study was carried out according to the PRISMA recommendations. We retrieved information reporting incidence of T1D among individuals aged more than 15 years in 35 countries, and published in 70 articles between 1982 and 2014. Specific anti-beta-cell proteins or C-peptide detection were performed in 14 of 70 articles (20%). The most frequent diagnostic criteria used were clinical symptoms and immediate insulin therapy. Country-to-country variations of incidence in those aged >15 years paralleled those of children in all age groups. T1D incidence was larger in males than in females in 44 of the 54 (81%) studies reporting incidence by sex in people >15 years of age. The overall mean male-to-female ratio in the review was 1.47 (95% CI = 1.33-1.60, SD = 0.49, n = 54, p = <0.0001). Overall, T1D incidence decreased in adulthood, after the age of 14 years. Few studies on epidemiology of T1D in adults are available worldwide, as compared to those reporting on children with T1D. The geographical variations of T1D incidence in adults parallel those reported in children. As opposed to what is known in children, the incidence is generally larger in males than in females. There is an unmet need to evaluate the incidence of autoimmune T1D in adults, using specific autoantibody detection, and to better analyze epidemiological specificities - if any - of adult T1D. CRD42012002369.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 335 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Unknown 330 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 59 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 55 16%
Student > Master 45 13%
Researcher 37 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 24 7%
Other 58 17%
Unknown 57 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 130 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 36 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 13 4%
Other 40 12%
Unknown 67 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2015.
All research outputs
#1,617,070
of 12,372,633 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,813
of 8,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,402
of 221,903 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#3
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,633 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,903 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.